Old photographs
show Thompson crossing the canal to visit his weavers.

Thompson was deeply captivated by the nostalgic charm of old, and more simple Bangkok. The enchanting aspects of life along the klong or waterways, fascinated him. Wooden houses, some in the traditional Thai style, in the cool shade of trees lining the river banks, their branches arching over across the klong. The daily traffic - boats plying up and down the waterway selling their wares.

Thompson had had his eye on this piece of land by Klong Maha Nag and just across from the weaving village of Ban Krua that he visited every morning. It was a piece of land that had once been part of the vast compound of a summer palace.

 
     
  Though the land is right in the heart of the city (a block away from the National Stadium), it retains a flavor of its country past. With city noises muted by the trees and by the klong, the pace seems visibly slower. The location has its appeal.

ACQUIRING THE LAND

According to Thai Law, foreigners may purchase up to one rai (approximately half an acre) of land for residential purposes provided that there is a reciprocal arrangement for Thai citizens in the buyer's home country or state. Fortunately for Thompson, Delaware met this requirement.

Letters written by Jim Thompson to his sister Elinor 
at the time he was planning his Thai house.